In National Code


History of the Development of the Code

The National Code is an industry-lead initiative to define the roles of various stakeholders in a nationally consistent approach for the management of access to the transport corridors (road and rail) by utility operators. The beneficiaries of both transport and utility services are the economy and the community.

The Code seeks to provide a consistent and cooperative framework for Corridor Managers and Utility Operators, to manage the corridor while providing for the access rights of Utility Operators. The intention is to provide a set of guiding principles for Corridor Managers and Utility Operators.

Representatives of all utilities, local authorities, Transit and ONTRACK collaboratively developed the Code as the industry's own solution, a national code that would govern all aspects of utilities access to the road/rail corridors. While much of the development was done by a dedicated team of six Directors, comprising two representatives each for utilities and local authorities, and one each from Transit and ONTRACK, many others helped in working groups, and peer and sector reviews.

The draft Code was launched in February 2008 at a series of seminars across New Zealand, attended by over 450 delegates from across all sectors. The intention of the seminars was to provide the context and rationale for the Code. Subsequently NZUAG invited formal submissions on the content. Following review of the 39 submissions received, the Directors Group amended the Code.

Following release of the Advance Copy of the new Code, NZUAG invited further submissions, as a final quality check. Thirteen submissions were received and reviewed before the Code was released in March 2009 for implementation across New Zealand.

The Utilities Access Act 2010 became law in August 2010. Since then, the Code has been reviewed to ensure it is consistent with that Act, and to prepare it for the required round of public consultation.

The summary of submissions was also forwarded to the Minister and is available below. It comprises an Excel spreadsheet with three sub-sheets:

  1. the Code Review Group's considered response to each suggestion and comment received from submitters on the draft code as released on 27 January 2011
  2. the additional comments received outside the ten potentially significant changes and the Code Review Group's considered response
  3. the Code Review Group's considered response to suggestions and comments received from submitters on the ten potentially significant changes

The Code was forwarded to the Minister for Infrastructure on 11 August 2011 and he gave approval on 10 November 2011. The Code became mandatory on 1 January 2012.

 Following a comprehensive review of the Code during 2014, a revised version was forwarded to the Minister for Infrastructure on 9 April 2015, with approval being given on 19 August 2015.  This revised version of the Code came into force on 10 September 2015

 


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